100 years of the Leica camera – in pictures

New York city 2000
New York City, 2000. Erwitt produced many images incorporating the canine to beguiling effect.
Photograph: Elliott Erwitt/Magnum Photos
Portugal, 1976
Portugal, 1976. The silent operation of the Leica allowed Josef Koudelka to shoot unnoticed. This shot is taken from his book Exiles.
Photograph: Josef Koudelka/Magnum Photos
Hyeres, 1932
Hyeres, 1932. A great example of the painterly photographer.
Photograph: Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos
Children in the gorbals, Glasgow, 1948
Children in the gorbals, Glasgow, 1948. 
Photograph: Bert Hardy/Hulton/Getty
South Vietnamese forces follow after terrified children, including 9-year-old  Kim Phuc, center, as they run down Route1 near Trang Bang after an aerial napalm attack on suspected Viet Cong hiding places on June 8, 1972
South Vietnamese forces follow terrified children, including nine-year-old Kim Phuc, centre, as they run down Route1 near Trang Bang after an aerial napalm attack on suspected Viet Cong hiding places on 8 June 1972. 
Photograph: Nick Ut/Associated Press
Overcrowded housing in London's Elephant and castle in 1948
Overcrowded housing in London’s Elephant and Castle in 1948. Hardy modified his Leica so it would perform better in low light conditions.
Photograph: Bert Hardy/Hulton/Getty
100 years of the Leica camera – in pictures
‘Sailor kissing the nurse’, New York, 14 August 1945.
Photograph: Alfred Eisenstaedt/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty
42nd Street New York City 1960
42nd Street, New York City, 1960. A long-time Observer photographer, Neil Libbert used a Leica M3 camera with a 35m Summicron lens. Photograph: Neil Libbert
Harlem Race Riots New York 1964
Harlem race riots, New York, 1964.
Photograph: Neil Libbert
Caravan park in Kerry, 2013
Caravan park in Kerry, 2013. Observer technology columnist and Leica fanatic John Naughton says : ‘The “austerity” regime imposed as a condition of the EU bailout was visible everywhere in Ireland at the time. The little boy was dejected because nobody would play football with him. It was one of those metaphorical moments. Photograph: John Naughton
Russian soldiers flying the Red Flag, made from table cloths, over the ruins of the Reichstag in Berlin, 1945.
Russian soldiers flying the Red Flag, made from table cloths, over the ruins of the Reichstag in Berlin, 1945. Photograph: Yevgeny Khaldei/Getty Images

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